Wednesday, April 11, 2018

Recent high-level recruitments lay foundation for future growth

The arrival of several key new personnel has set NEL on a firm path to future growth, providing expertise that the lab needs to develop its services and fully exploit its new and improved research facilities.

“Our overall business strategy is to grow our capabilities, both in terms of our facilities and expertise,” says Operations Director, Mark Roscoe. “To facilitate this, we are bringing in experts who can drive the development across the full breadth of our activities, from fundamental research through to commercial testing and consultancy services.

“This recruitment builds on other recent additions to our team, such as our principal consultant Dr. Bruno Pinguet, who joined in 2017,” Mark adds. “It gets us ready to make full use of our new-era multiphase research facilities, which are due to start commercial operation in early 2019.

Among the new staff taken on is Mark Ruston, Head of Infrastructure, Test and Calibration, who will draw on his experience at Doosan Babcock and the Royal Navy to provide leadership in the development of NEL’s testing services.

“NEL is embarking on a new phase in its life thanks to a significant investment in new leading-edge test facilities,” says Mark. “The new service will be a world first, operating at the limits of current knowledge and experience.  Therefore it has to be managed carefully to ensure a successful launch that lays the foundation for NEL’s continued future.”

Dr Sandy Black has been recruited as a project engineer. He has a PhD from the University of Leeds in CFD modelling related to carbon capture and storage technology, and has extensive consultancy experience, so will drive the development of NEL’s services in these areas.

“I will be focusing on the growth of Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) consultancy services,” says Sandy. “I will be working to provide solutions for clients and develop business opportunities from existing and new markets.”

Growth in fundamental research and development will be driven Dr Martin Hanton who joined NEL from Sasol Technology UK at the beginning of 2018 as Head of R&D. His in-depth research background and extensive experience working at the interface of academia and industry, will be applied at both a national Flow Programme and international level.

“My recruitment is a key part of TUV SUD NEL’s strategy to expand its overall research and development activities,” says Martin. “With my background and experience I look forward to guiding the company on this important journey.”

For more information, contact Mark Roscoe.

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Tuesday, April 10, 2018

Energy Institute standards update helps disseminate good practice to industry

A recently completed project to update two Energy Institute (EI) standards will help the organisation to disseminate good practice to industry. Although not part of the Flow Programme, delivering this work dovetails well with NEL’s remit as part of the government’s National Measurement System.

“The project involved desk research and production of drafts,” says Principal Consultant, Dr Michael Reader-Harris, who undertook the research. “I got good, constructive feedback from the industry representatives to whom the drafts were sent for comment. This showed a good level of interest in the areas that the standards cover. The comments themselves served to strengthen the upgrade work, ensuring that the revised standards reflect the realities that companies face.”

The first of the two reviewed standards is designated HM 34. It deals with the data required for a comprehensive evaluation of a liquid flow meter. The second, HM 45, deals with the statistical control of measuring instruments using control charts.

The HM 34 guidance comprises a series of questions that a manufacturer should answer (and a purchaser ask) to ensure that an informed decision can be made about meter choice. The questions cover aspects such as a meter’s flowrate range, pressure and temperature ranges, output and installation requirements.

“The updates on HM 34 encompassed the various changes that have taken place in metering technology since the standard was last updated, 15 years ago,” Michael explains. “These were particularly important in areas such as electronic outputs.”

HM 45 deals with situations in which a device such as a prover is used on a regular basis to calibrate a meter and the resulting data used to populate a control chart. “The key element of this update was incorporating material about statistical control from an earlier EI document,” explains Michael. “We created new annexes to HM 45 to make all relevant information easy to access.”

The Energy Institute (EI) is the professional body for the energy industry, developing and sharing knowledge, skills and good practice towards a safe, secure and sustainable energy system.

For more information, contact Michael Reader Harris.

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Monday, April 09, 2018

Flow Programme report maps out scope of research for next three years

The new Flow Programme Scope of Work report has been released by the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS). This three-year strategic document sets out the extent of one of the main science programmes carried out within the UK’s National Measurement System (NMS).

“As part of our NMS remit, NEL is responsible for the flow measurement aspects of the programme,” says NEL’s Managing Director, Brian Millington. “This work contributes to the UK’s international efforts on flow measurement standardisation and knowledge transfer. Under this programme, we will be moving forward strongly in several key technical and research areas, including the measurement and metrology of clean fuels. The work will help unlock the potential of non-fossil fuels such as hydrogen for UK industry and society.”

The main activity areas outlined in the report include the development of new flow measurement research expertise and facilities. They also include the maintenance and improvement of the National Flow Measurement Standards, along with knowledge transfer and overall programme management.

The programme of work is worth over £13.9 million and encompasses over 25 projects ranging from small reviews to multi-million-pound long-term projects. The programme also includes five Engineering Doctorate (EngD) research projects.

The Flow Programme is funded by BEIS, with collaboration and co-funding from other bodies including Scottish Enterprise and TÜV SÜD AG.

The Flow Measurement Special Interest Group within InstMC (formerly the Flow Measurement Institute) was the key agency involved in the development of the programme of work outlined in the report. Other bodies included NPL and LGC. The strategy was reviewed by the independent group of industry and academic experts known as the Programme Expert Group (PEG).  PEG members were also involved throughout the formulation process and provided the final prioritisation of the programme scope.

For more information, contact Brian Millington.

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Thursday, April 05, 2018

Research on Small Volume Provers opens the door to potential industry benefits

Research for a global R&D organisation has highlighted several ways in which a key measurement proving technology can be enhanced. The project is set to generate further collaborative work and should lead to significant practical and financial benefits for the oil industry.

The project focused on small volume provers (SVP). It was undertaken for the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI), which works with leading members of the energy pipeline industry around the world.

“The overall aim of the project was to identify best practice and areas where improvements could be made,” says Project Manager, Dr Linda Rowan. “The work included an industry review, a survey of PRCI members, an assessment of different proving methods and a gap analysis of the design and operation of SVP’s. Users of over 400 proving systems were surveyed.”

SVPs are used to validate the performance of Coriolis and ultrasonic (USM) flow meters in hydrocarbon liquid pipeline transportation systems. Many oil companies are now using SVPs due to their cost-benefit advantages.

The research took place in TUV SUD NEL’s research facilities in East Kilbride and ran from the middle to the end of 2017. It received positive feedback from the client, who commented: “We very much appreciate the quality of work as well as your professional support.”

TUV SUD NEL researchers highlighted, assessed and prioritised over twenty areas of concern relating to SVPs. Gaps in current knowledge about the technology were identified and recommendations on how to fill these gaps were made.

Following on from this project, PRCI hosted a webinar for its members during which TUV SUD NEL presented the project’s findings. It is hoped that TUV SUD NEL’s Elevated Pressure and Temperature facility will be used to ‘fill in’ the information gaps the project found. A number of other joint projects are also being discussed.

Improvements to SVPs and other prover technology could have many significant benefits, including helping reduce system measurement uncertainty, improving overall pipeline balancing and reducing the minimum detection thresholds of leak detection systems. The proving market is estimated at $200m annually, so any improvements will have significant economic repercussions.

For more details, contact Linda Rowan.

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Wednesday, April 04, 2018

Revised standard provides updated guidance on the effects of pulsating flow

The latest standards development work carried out under the UK National Flow Programme has updated ISO guidance on the effects of pulsation of the process stream on flow measurement instruments.

“The new standard tells you how to take pulsations into account in calculations,” explains Principal Consultant, Dr Michael Reader-Harris. “This is something that no other flow standards tells you how to do.”

The new standard is ISO/TR 3313:2018. It provides a definition of pulsating flow and indicates how to detect it. It has broad applicability and describes the effects of pulsating flow on orifice plates, nozzles or Venturi tubes, turbine and vortex flowmeters. These flowmeters are amongst the types that are most susceptible to pulsation effects.

“The work was a revision of the existing standard, but not a normal revision,” Michael explains. “The original standard was twenty years old and ISO said that it was no longer in an acceptable form. We decided to re-instate the standard, as the information it contained was in danger of being lost, and to make it good for the next twenty years.”

According to Michael the standard is vitally important because it enables people to improve the measurement of pulsating flows, which are found in many real-world situations.

Michael’s work, which took place over the last two years, was all desk-based, with BSI editors making a significant contribution. All the original standard’s equations were reviewed and checked, inaccuracies were addressed and the standard’s equations were reformatted into a modern style.

“It was a significant piece of work,” Michael says. “We had to recover information from twenty years ago. We couldn’t repeat the research that had been carried out for the original standard as the test rigs no longer exists and many of the people involved with the original research had retired.”

 For more details, contact Michael Reader-Harris.

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Tuesday, April 03, 2018

New Head of R&D positioning TUV SUD NEL for future growth

Dr Martin Hanton joined TUV SUD NEL at the beginning of 2018 as Head of R&D. He has now established himself in his post and is working to expand the lab’s capabilities and expertise, particularly in the development of clean fuel metrology.

“My recruitment is a key part of TUV SUD NEL’s strategy to expand its overall research and development activities,” says Martin. “Drawing on my previous training and experience, I look forward to guiding the company on this important journey.”

According to Martin, growing the lab’s innovation capabilities is crucial, not only to allow it to remain at the cutting edge of flow metrology in existing areas, but also to position it to work in new and emerging fields and to allow it to meet future challenges. These include the development of primary standards and industry guidance that will enable new clean fuels to be utilized by society.

“When people start filling up their vehicles with LNG or hydrogen, they will want to be sure that there are infrastructure and regulations in place that mean they get what they are paying for,” Martin explains. “TUV SUD NEL needs to adapt as the UK and the wider world transitions to a new energy landscape based upon clean fuels. Our R&D program therefore needs to position us as a leader in this field and to identify the optimum metering approaches that should be used.”

Before joining the company, Martin worked at Sasol Technology UK, a subsidiary of the Sasol Group specialising in R&D for fuels, refining and petrochemical production.

“Technically, my core skills are in chemistry, although I have notable experience of economic assessment, IP strategy development and patenting, coding (VBA, C++), chemical engineering and HSE,” Martin notes. “From a management perspective, my primary experience is in relation to building and leading technical teams.”

Martin was awarded a BSc and PhD in chemistry from Leicester University and a Diploma in Management from Dundee College/Charted Management Institute. He has been a RSC Chartered Chemist since 2006.

 For more details, contact Martin Hanton.

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Tuesday, March 27, 2018

Transforming our Knowledge Management

The first phase of an important transformation project has been completed. This work involved a Rapid Scoping exercise that focused on the management of data within NEL. It has set the lab on course for long-term improvements in the way it manages, controls, uses and make its knowledge accessible.

“The purpose of the project was to highlight challenges and summarise priorities and options for improvement,” says Operations Director, Mark Roscoe. “Overall I am seeking to develop a new platform that will maximise the potential for how we use our data and knowledge for engineering and science”.

The Rapid Scoping exercise was carried out by London-based digital consultancy Methods, who were engaged in November 2017. The exercise used key stakeholder interviews to get information.

NEL’s people, processes and systems were all assessed. The team from Methods explored the core business processes and the extent to which they are fit for purpose. They also highlighted key process issues for review.

This work is part of an ongoing project. The next step will involve a meeting with the National Physical Laboratory to look at their approaches and platforms for knowledge management and sharing best practice elsewhere.

Since its establishment in 1990, Methods has partnered with a range of central government departments and agencies to transform the way public sector operates in the UK. Its mission is to help safeguard public-facing services and apply digital thinking to make sure the future of public services is centered around citizens.

For more details, contact Mark Roscoe.

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MeterVue’s enhanced functionality delivers regulatory and other benefits

The functionality of NEL’s unique MeterVue system has been further enhanced. Alongside the video streaming capabilities highlighted in a previous E-zine, the system can now handle the calibration of two meters in series. The system’s new video capability has also seen it accepted by an international Notified Body (NMi) for formal meter approval.

“The latest addition to MeterVue’s functionality covers simultaneous remote monitoring of meters which are being tested in series,” says Alun Thomas, Director of Technical Services at I+P Services, the company that jointly developed the MeterVue system with NEL.

“The new capability will significantly enhance the scope of the remote monitoring service we can provide and will also prove very useful when undertaking our own internal calibrations,” says Phil Mark, NEL’s Group Manager for Testing.

The multiple meter enhancement was specified by customers who required this functionality. This was also the case with the addition of video streaming.

MeterVue’s video functionality was developed as part of a project with a leading European company that supplies digitally connected and enabled industrial equipment. The company came to NEL to use its world class facilities for witness testing. The company applied to Dutch organisation NMi, to see whether this testing could be done remotely using the MeterVue system. NMi responded by saying that this could happen only if video streaming capabilities were provided as they needed to see technicians operating the equipment.

“NMi used the video streaming to provide absolute security that no one had made any unauthorised changes to the parameters used in the test installation,” explains Alun Thomas.

Launched in October 2013, MeterVue is an innovative web-based service that allows engineers to remotely witness calibration tests at NEL’s laboratories in real time. This saves significant amounts of travel time and money. It can be used for both multiphase as well as single-phase meter calibrations and provides a secure, online repository for both the flow meter’s official calibration certificate and the supporting test data.

For more details, contact Phil Mark.

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Monday, March 26, 2018

Flow Programme Quarterly Report highlights technical and research progress

The latest Flow Programme Quarterly Report highlights significant technical developments, advances in research and progress in knowledge transfer. The report for the Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy (BEIS) provides a summary of progress on Flow Programme activities carried out from October 2017 to December 2017.

“The report shows that our research teams are moving forward strongly,” says Managing Director, Brian Millington. “Looking forward, it confirms that our work up till 2021 will be strongly aligned with the productivity and competitive pillars of the government’s Industrial Strategy.”

As highlighted in the report, NEL’s research portfolio has a wide range of applications that extend beyond its core focus of the oil and gas industry. For example, a project to improve metering for Liquified Natural Gas (LNG) and Liquefied BioGas (LBG) has secured key partner collaboration across industry. Research is also well advanced looking at the metrology challenges associated with Hydrogen vehicles.

The Quarterly report underlines NEL’s progress in standards, including the publication of TR 15377 which brings the results of previous Flow Programme research on the use of orifice plates with drain holes into standards.  In addition, NEL has taken leadership of the first ever ISO committee to develop a standard for the use of multiphase flow meters.  The will be a major landmark, leading to wider adoption of this technology by industry.

Success is also highlighted in knowledge transfer, where the lab continues to advance: 3.5 million reader contacts were reached in the last quarter, up from 2.5 million for the same period in the previous year.

NEL is one of the lead organisations in the UK’s National Measurement System (NMS). As part of its NMS remit, NEL is responsible for the UK’s Flow Programme and the dissemination of progress updates and knowledge arising from the work undertaken.

For further information, contact Brian Millington

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Monday, March 19, 2018

Deadline now approaching to submit abstracts for the first North Sea Workshop to be held in Aberdeen

The deadline is now approaching to submit abstracts for this year’s North Sea Flow Measurement Workshop which, for the first time ever, will be held in Aberdeen, the Energy Capital of Europe. The workshop is the premier flow measurement event for the oil and gas industry and will take place between the 22nd and 24th of October 2018 at Ardoe House Hotel. The deadline for abstracts is the 26 March 2018.

Download the flyer here.

“The theme of this year’s workshop is maximising economic recovery,” says Craig Marshall, who is Chairman of the Workshop and Technical Committee. “We have selected technical topics to ensure it’s going to be a great programme to encourage knowledge sharing on best practice and networking.”

The event’s technical committee is interested in papers representing all aspects of flow measurement, however the following topics are of particular interest: Optimising production from existing and near-field resources; developing frontier and deepwater areas; unlocking low-recovery reservoirs; achieving small-field optimisation; and deploying cost effective technology.  To maintain the practical aspect of the event, case-study style papers and those led by end-users will be given priority.

Running for over 30 years and alternating its location between the UK and Norway, the North Sea Flow Measurement Workshop combines presentations, discussion sessions and exhibition areas. This event brings together individuals from the entire supply chain: operators, service and supply companies, manufacturers, consultants, regulators, researchers and standards bodies. It delivers technical presentations, showcases new technology and provides excellent networking opportunities.

The 2018 Workshop is being run by TUV SUD NEL in association with Tekna, Norwegian Society for Oil and Gas Measurement. Follow the North Sea Flow Measurement Workshop LinkedIn company page to join the discussion, get updates about the speaker programme, and early notification of the registration process.

Download the call for abstracts form here.

Download the flyer here.

Click for more details, or contact Craig Marshall

Email our events team to be added to the priority information list.

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Eng-D research set to help development of marginal oil and gas fields

A research project being carried out under the TUV SUD NEL/Coventry University Eng-D programme is assessing a range of online continuous oil-in-water analysis technology. The results of the project will help facilitate the development of marginal oil and gas fields, as well as those located in deep and ultra-deep waters.

“I’ve recently finished testing two different technologies,” says Zak Latif, who started the research in 2015. “The first is laser-induced fluorescence, the second microscopy imaging. We are also researching the effect of different chemicals, temperatures and flow rates on these technologies.”

“We hope to prove to the regulator that such on-line devices can be used for regulatory purposes. This research should negate the need for companies to take samples of produced water back to the lab for assessment.”

According to Zak, the development of oil-in-water analysers capable of reliable oil concentration measurement would be an important step forward for the oil and gas industry. It is one of a number of technology gaps that need to be bridged to make subsea separation and produced water re-injection common practice. These processes are an integral part of subsea processing, which allows many oil fields, such as deep-water reservoirs, to become economically feasible.

As well as the development of online continuous oil-in-water analysers, Zak’s research includes the development and review of produced water re-injection (PWRI) Discharge Regulatory Standards, a technology assessment and a market study.

“Knowledge transfer is a very important part of this project,” Zak adds. “We hope to roll out the knowledge and expertise we gain from this research to the global oil and gas sector through consultancy support on major Ultra Deep Water development projects.”

The four-year Engineering Doctorate (EngD) that Zak is following is delivered by in-house experts from Coventry University and TUV SUD NEL.

For more details, contact Zak Latif

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Friday, March 16, 2018

Houston Forum gives positive reaction to new heavy oil measurement technique

Delegates at the Upstream Production Measurement Forum, which was held in Houston in February, expressed interest in a new calibration methodology being developed at TUV SUD NEL. The technology, which was introduced in a paper delivered by Flow Measurement Consultant Craig Marshall, is designed to improve the accuracy of differential pressure meters.

“My paper looked at the measurement of heavy oils using differential pressure meters and outlined a new, research-proven method that can improve the accuracy of flow measurements in heavy oils that have a low Reynolds number,” Craig explains. “Delegates at the forum were very interested and I got some great questions at the end of my presentation. Although this is not a commercial product yet, we have shown through market research that there is industry demand for the new technique and feedback at Houston underlined this.”

“Accurate flow measurement in heavy oils (below a Reynolds number of 2 x 104) is extremely difficult using traditional flow measurement technology due to the increase in frictional forces through the meter,” Craig explains. “If the Reynolds number is not accurately known then potentially significant errors in flow measurement of up to 40% can be introduced.”

Craig’s new method can remove these errors by providing the Reynolds number of a flow in real-time. This, in turn, allows it to provide a corrected discharge coefficient. Furthermore, his approach can deliver a calculation of the density and the viscosity of a fluid, providing a 3-in-1 measurement solution. Craig’s is one of the first measurement techniques that is independent of operating Reynolds number, which makes it ideal for heavy oil flow measurement.

The Upstream Production Measurement Forum (UPM Forum) is a not-for-profit, industry-organized conference and exhibition that addresses the needs for flow measurement in land, offshore topsides and subsea oil and gas production. The 2018 forum brought together operators, suppliers, researchers and regulators to share information and developments.

For more details, contact Craig Marshall.

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Thursday, March 15, 2018

Research on Small Volume Provers opens the door to potential industry benefits

Research for a global R&D organisation has highlighted several ways in which a key measurement proving technology can be enhanced. The project is set to generate further collaborative work and should lead to significant practical and financial benefits for the oil industry.

The project focused on small volume provers (SVP). It was undertaken for the Pipeline Research Council International (PRCI), which works with leading members of the energy pipeline industry around the world.

“The overall aim of the project was to identify best practice and areas where improvements could be made,” says Project Manager, Dr Linda Rowan. “The work included an industry review, a survey of PRCI members, an assessment of different proving methods and a gap analysis of the design and operation of SVP’s. Users of over 400 proving systems were surveyed.”

SVPs are used to validate the performance of Coriolis and ultrasonic (USM) flow meters in hydrocarbon liquid pipeline transportation systems. Many oil companies are now using SVPs due to their cost-benefit advantages.

The research took place in NEL’s research facilities in East Kilbride and ran from the middle to the end of 2017. It received positive feedback from the client, who commented: “We very much appreciate the quality of work as well as your professional support.”

NEL researchers highlighted, assessed and prioritised over twenty areas of concern relating to SVPs. Gaps in current knowledge about the technology were identified and recommendations on how to fill these gaps were made.

Following on from this project, PRCI is hosting a webinar for its members on 4 April (register here) during which NEL will present the project’s findings. It is hoped that NEL’s EPAT (elevated pressure and temperature) facility will be used to ‘fill in’ the information gaps the project found. Several other joint projects are also being discussed.

Improvements to SVPs and other prover technology could have several significant benefits, including helping reduce system measurement uncertainty, improving overall pipeline balancing and reducing the minimum detection thresholds of leak detection systems. The proving market is estimated at $200m annually, so any improvements will have significant economic repercussions.

For more details, contact Linda Rowan.

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Thursday, March 08, 2018

Standards development work to improve accuracy of key metering technology

Standards development work carried out under the UK National Flow Programme will deliver enhanced accuracy for a key measurement technology used in the oil and gas industry. The revised standard ISO/TR 15377:2018 was published in January. It provides guidelines for the specification of orifice plates, nozzles and Venturi tubes beyond the scope of ISO 5167.

The research involved the revision of the existing standard, ISO/TR 15377:2007. It was carried out by Principal Consultant, Dr Michael Reader-Harris. The revision was necessary because research showed that the equation used in the standard to describe the behaviour of orifice plates with drain holes was unsatisfactory.

“The equations used to develop the old standard were based on engineering judgement rather than experimental data,” Michael explains. “To address this issue, we collected a robust set of data on the performance of orifice plates with drain holes. Equations based on our new data were then incorporated into the revised standard.”

Orifice plates with drain holes are used by operators to measure gas flows that are intermittently wet, for example when some liquid is introduced into a pipeline over a short period of time for cleaning. Drain holes let this liquid drain away.

“The new standard will reduce the uncertainty of measurements using these devices,” Michael says. “It will enable people to use this technology who have not used it before, as they thought that the standard wasn’t robust enough. There are many such devices in use, including a surprisingly large number in dry networks.”

Michael’s work involved calibrating meters in a single-phase fluid, using a comprehensive range of designs and pipe dimensions (from 2-inch to 8-inch diameters).

“The project was more complicated than we expected,” Michael reports. “This was due to orientation issues and the relationship between the flows through the different holes in the devices. We investigated these effects thoroughly to find out exactly what was going on.”

 For more details, contact Michael Reader-Harris.

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Wednesday, March 07, 2018

Egypt Petroleum Show highlights new business opportunities in the region

The recent Egypt Petroleum Show (EGYPS) highlighted several important business opportunities for UK industry and for our researchers and consultants.

“There is a big drive by the Egyptian government to enhance the country’s energy security and to use domestic energy resources,” says Head of Sales & Marketing, Thomas McCudden, who was part of the team at the event. “At the conference it was very clear that the Egyptian government is keen to support more development in both the on-shore and off-shore sectors and that many companies are expanding their operations in the area. The government is trying to reduce red tape and to get more oil and gas expertise into the country.”

According to Thomas, the overall message from the conference was one of optimism, with predictions for a healthier future for Egypt, through increased investment by international oil companies and increased collaboration between such companies and the Egyptian government.

“One of the highlights of the event for us was a meeting with the Gulf of Suez Petroleum Company (GUPCO),” Thomas says. “This company is facing a number of production measurement challenges and is interested in our expertise. We hope to capitalise on this over the next few months. We also met with the local TÜV SÜD Egypt office who were very keen to help us expand our business in the region."

The EGYPS event, which took place in Cairo in the middle of February, was visited by 15,000 oil and gas professionals from across North Africa, Middle East and the Mediterranean. There was also a two-day strategic conference featuring the CEO’s of Eni, Subsea 7, BP, Baker Hughes and Apache.

TUV SUD NEL was part of the Scottish Development International (SDI) delegation, along with about 20 other Scottish companies. Footfall at the SDI stand was high and interest in Scottish expertise was strong.

For more details, contact Thomas McCudden.

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About

NEL is a world class provider of technical consulting, research, measurement, testing and programme management services to clients across many industries including oil & gas, renewable and sustainable energy, process and government.

NEL also holds the UK National Standards for flow measurement and has an international reputation in key engineering areas such as flow measurement, computational fluid dynamics, environmental and thermal engineering.

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